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As Republicans and Democrats, like the Capulets and the Montagues, battle for political power while innocent people die, poignant words come to mind from Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, spoken by Mercutio as he lay dying: “A plague a’ both your houses!”

After the Boston Marathon bombing, the general consensus was that politicizing tragedy is crassly inappropriate.  The night before David Axelrod revealed that the president thought the carnage was a result of Tax Day, many felt the more suitable reaction would be to heed the politicized platitude Obama extended when he said “on days like this there are no Republicans or Democrats — we are Americans, united in concern for our fellow citizens.”

Yet, without minimizing the misery being experienced by more than 150 people and their families, it’s hard to deny that Boston has everything to do with politics.  It is long past the time that America should have already admitted that we now live in a country where our leaders are more concerned with not offending anyone than they are about the people they’ve vowed to protect.

Boston is about politics, because we have a Department of Homeland Security that is headed up by a woman who reassured America that the border is more secure than ever, knowing full well that it is not.

Instead of monitoring the nation’s safety, Janet ‘Big Sis’ Napolitano squanders resources on pricey hollow-point bullets, chases down “dangerous hairdryers,” and writes accusatory reports neutralizing the threat of true adversaries while demonizing ex-military personnel, raising suspicions about all right-leaning conservatives, and insinuating that many Christians are white supremacists.

What happened in the Hub is political because the president’s supposedly heartfelt speech after the Newtown shootings contained a paragraph concerning federal resources, caring for victims, and counseling the families that was copied verbatim and pasted into the scripted comments he delivered following the marathon bombing.

The difference between the two public statements was that although Michelle Obama was mentioned in both, the latter speech lacked the bogus waterworks he turned on in his Newtown appearance – not to mourn the death of 20 small children, mind you, but in hopes of furthering an anti-gun agenda.

Again, the events in Boston are about politics, because whenever an incident provides fodder for issues Obama is looking to advance, he’s the first one to do what he advised Americans not to do.

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