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Being one who tends toward expressing concepts, feelings, and ideas via metaphors, analogies, and hyperbole, it’s been difficult to adequately articulate the foreboding that looms large as New Year 2014 approaches. 

Thus far, I have not stumbled upon one example that can suffice as an adequate analogy to describe the dread that pervades the atmosphere as the New Year approaches.

Then, as luck would have it, a doomsday film directed by Danish screenwriter Lars von Trier entitled Melancholia, gifted with a plot, characters, and a horrifying ending, was able to give voice to the impending disaster I like to call Obamacholia, which is about be visited upon the American people.

Ironically, there is an actual asteroid named 5708 Melancholia. However, the film Melancholia is fictional and involves a mega-planet which, like Obamacare, is on a crash course with Earth. The cast of characters includes one who suffers from melancholia, a type of severe depression – like what three-quarters of America is about to experience as massive government control prepares to completely overwhelm us.

As imminent disaster unfolded, Richard Wagner‘s tragic opera Tristan und Isolde added a heartrending score to the grey and depressing movie. Likewise, Tristan und Isolde could add appropriate textural background music to the current political climate currently dogging our nation, defenseless against a larger-than-life president who seems determined to rain destruction upon everything in his path.

The bulk of the 2011 film chronicles the days leading up to the end of the world as three family members with starkly different psyches face their destiny.

The reactions of the characters can easily be likened to the different responses the American public is currently exhibiting as our own private hell careens toward us, promising to abolish life as we know it.

In the movie the main character, Justine, suffers from a clinical case of melancholia. Watching closely, Justine is acutely aware of a red star in the sky that appears and then disappears on the night of her ill-fated wedding. Similar to the hope that Obamacare will be repealed, which is not likely, the planet Melancholia disappears behind the sun, teasing its victims, only to circle back around on a path headed straight for Earth.

As a symptom of her illness, in the past Justine had repeatedly visualized the end of a world she considers evil and deserving of destruction. Yet, despite her psychological disorder and emotional weakness, when reality hits, unlike the others, as the massive blue sphere approaches she is better able to resign herself to the coming apocalypse.

Justine’s sister, Claire, cares for the emotionally ill Justine, who is so crippled by depression following her wedding that she’s unable to even bathe herself. Melancholics are often unruffled when situations are most ominous, which is when “normal” people like Claire – and most of America – typically fall apart.

Claire behaves very much like the Americans who are currently overcome with the dread of what is heading our way.  Refusing to accept the assurances that all is well, Claire fears the worst and endeavors to face those fears and find out for herself.  When she does, her reaction is pure terror and uncontrolled panic.

Then there’s John, Claire’s husband.  John typifies a liberal, living life in total denial.

John agrees with the experts: in the movie the experts are scientists, and in America’s case, the “experts” are left-wing politicians and the lapdog media. John is led to believe, by the hopers, that if he insists that the planet will fly past the Earth and provide a stunning planetary show, all will be well.

Ever the optimist, John even sets up a high-powered telescope for a nighttime viewing of Melancholia. In desperation, looking skyward, clinging to false hope and sounding like a skeptical but hopeful Obamacare enrollee, Claire says, “It looks friendly.”

Listen to the Left and they’re convinced that Obamacare is wonderful and that in due time, if they repeat the talking points often enough, their socialized medicine dreams will be realized.

As it turns out, John is a cowardly man. After repeatedly reassuring his hysterical wife, confused son, and resigned sister-in-law that they have nothing to fear,  John realizes that Melancholia is about to strike the Earth.  To escape the fear and horror of being hit with what he once considered harmless and intriguing, John steals and then downs a lethal dose of his wife’s pills .  Sound familiar?

Beautifully filmed with a magnificent score, the catastrophic film does not end well. And despite Justine building a magic tepee with twigs to sit in while holding hands with her sister Claire and her nephew Leo, the rogue planet eventually collides with Earth, obliterating all.

So as January 1st approaches, with it comes a ne’er-do-well policy 10 times larger than any negative force America has ever had to deal with.

Rest assured that what is coming is not going to be stopped: it is enormous and indisputable. And unfortunately it could annihilate everything in its path.

What remains to be seen is whether or not the havoc Obamacholia wreaks on this nation can be compared to a movie where a huge planet hurtles toward, collides with, and ultimately destroys our world.



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