Liberals Love Misery

MiseryTalk about an article written with Liberalism in mind!

Misery loves company, and Liberals are throwing misery bashes. Look at all the misery the Obama administration has created.

Double-digit unemployment, inflation, gut-busting spending, massive debt, and that’s just for starters.

As with cries of racism, cries of misery can be emboldening for Liberals. When you make everybody poor, it’s easy to get people to demonize the rich. We are all in it together, so to speak. When you are miserable, every perceived good thing is over-exaggerated.

Most of us claim we want to be happy—to have meaningful lives, enjoy ourselves, experience fulfillment, and share love and friendship with other people and maybe other species, like dogs, cats, birds, and whatnot. Strangely enough, however, some people act as if they just want to be miserable, and they succeed remarkably at inviting misery into their lives, even though they get little apparent benefit from it, since being miserable doesn’t help them find lovers and friends, get better jobs, make more money, or go on more interesting vacations.

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Why do they do this? After perusing the output of some of the finest brains in the therapy profession, I’ve come to the conclusion that misery is an art form, and the satisfaction people seem to find in it reflects the creative effort required to cultivate it. In other words, when your living conditions are stable, peaceful, and prosperous—no civil wars raging in your streets, no mass hunger, no epidemic disease, no vexation from poverty—making yourself miserable is a craft all its own, requiring imagination, vision, and ingenuity. It can even give life a distinctive meaning.

Read more of the 14 Habits of Highly Miserable People

 

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