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Another Leftist Sex Scandal: This One Hits the New York Times

Glen Thrush is a White House Correspondent for the New York Times. He also is a regular contributor on MSNBC.

Now, Thrush is the latest target of sexual harassment claims. 

Sex scandal scoops leftist mediaLike many of his fellow perverts, Thrush has a thousand excuses for his behavior. Shortly after being suspended from the New York Times, Thrush entered a drug & alcohol treatment center in hopes of covering his own behind.

Previous to the allegations against Thrush, he was described as a “star reporter” by most media outlets. In fact, he recently landed a book deal thanks to his White House coverage. However, it was Thrush’s own hypocrisy that marked the beginning of the end for this renowned journalist.

Hypocrisy at its Best

After an article outlined accusations against political journalist Mark Halperin, Thrush wrote, “Young people who come into a newsroom deserve to be taught our trade, given our support and enlisted in our calling — not betrayed by little men who believe they are bigger than the mission.”

For one woman, those words were too much to digest. She told journalist Laura McGann about her experiences with Thrush.

“He kept saying he’s an advocate for women and women journalists,” a 23-year-old woman told me, recounting an incident with Thrush from this past June. “That’s how he presented himself to me. He tried to make himself seem like an ally and a mentor.”

She paused. “Kind of ironic now.”

Thrush and the young woman met at her colleague’s going-away party at a bar near the Politico newsroom, she told me, and shared a few rounds of drinks in a booth. The night, she said, ended on a Washington street corner, where Thrush left her in tears after she resisted his advances.

The Call Out

Thrush was called out for his behavior. Therefore his suspension should come a no surprise to the self-proclaimed sympathetic newsman.

The encounter was troubling enough to the woman that her friend Bianca Padró Ocasio, also 23 and a journalist, confronted Thrush about his behavior via text message the next day.

“I want to make sure you don’t lure young women aspiring journalists into those situations ever again,” she texted. “So help me out here. How can I do that?”

Thrush was apologetic but defensive.

“I don’t lure anybody ever,” he wrote, according to screenshots provided by Padró Ocasio. “I got drunk because I got some shitty health news. And I am acutely aware of the hurdles that young women face in this business and have spent the better part of 20 years advocating for women journalists.”

And by advocating, he means grabbing their asses. In fact, McGann had her own run in with Thrush.

Five years ago, when Thrush and I were colleagues at Politico, I was in the same bar as Padró Ocasio’s friend — perhaps the same booth — when he caught me off guard, put his hand on my thigh, and suddenly started kissing me. Thrush says that he recalls the incident differently.

Furthermore, three young women I interviewed, including the young woman who met Thrush in June, described to me a range of similar experiences, from unwanted groping and kissing to wet kisses out of nowhere to hazy sexual encounters that played out under the influence of alcohol. Each woman described feeling differently about these experiences: scared, violated, ashamed, weirded out. I was — and am — angry.

A Pattern Emerges

As with every other powerful man being called out for his misbehavior, the incidents share uncanny similarities. McGann continues:

Details of their stories suggest a pattern. All of the women were in their 20s at the time. They were relatively early in their careers compared to Thrush, who was the kind of seasoned journalist who would be good to know. At an event with alcohol, he made advances. Afterward, they (as I did) thought it best to stay on good terms with Thrush, whatever their feelings.

Ironic that the New York Times sparked the current outcry of social injustice with their Weinstein expose. Obviously, the downfall of movie mogul Harvey Weinstein created a domino effect.

Hollywood big wigs are dropping like flies, and politicians are taking big hits as women speak out at a record-setting pace.

Meanwhile, the Times didn’t have much to say when one of their own was caught with his pants down, literally. Predictably, they used a classic response for the matter. “No comment.”

 

 



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